I London Eye

I read that the London Eye is the tallest “Big Wheel” or “Ferris Wheel” in Europe! Although it would be fair to say it’s probably the slowest.. I tend to think of it as a prison for tourists, a convenient way to keep them of the streets for an hour or so.

I imagine that a lot of people like looking at a skyline of glass office blocks and the remains of a long bygone power. Personally, I hate the stupid thing as all it reminds me of is super spending war criminal Tony Blair. I console myself that it will probably be gone in another fifty years if not sooner. It’s only a shame that I wont be around to see that happen..

Eye

Big Wheel

Well for those people that do ride the idiotic thing remember this when you look east towards Tower Bridge and south of the river. A decent set of people did actually live in those houses and flats not so long ago.

Peabody

” I consider that a poor man’s town dwelling should consist of a living-room and bedroom, with provision for additional bedrooms when required; that it should possess a plentiful and accessible supply of water, both for ablution and cooking; a W.C., sink and lavatory, distinct, but not far removed from his tenement; a wash-house, with the means of drying clothes in any weather without artificial heat; and, lastly, when practicable, a play-ground for his children”.


So said the wealthy American philanthropist George Peabody (1795-1868). In 1862, he founded the Peabody Donation Fund, providing £500,000 for “the construction of such improved dwellings for the poor as may combine in the utmost possible degree the essentials of healthfulness, comfort, social enjoyment and economy” for Londoners, and acknowledged by Queen Victoria as “wholly without parallel.”.The fund, which was incorporated by an Act of Parliament in 1948, has traditionally become known as the Peabody Trust.

The peabody trust estate between Roupell Street and Duchy Street (pictured here) was built in 1871 and as such was one of the first estates built from the fund. As far as I know The Peabody Trust cannot sell these properties under the original trust agreements; so at least some small part of this working class legacy will remain a on the south bank of London.